SHA 2015 Seattle: Preliminary Program

The SHA 2015 Seattle preliminary program is available and online registration is now open until December 19, 2014!

Registration

                                  Until 12/1/14    After 12/1/14       
SHA Member:                    $180               $205
Non-Member:                     $280               $305
SHA Student Member:      $85                 $110
Student Non-Member:       $140               $165
Guest:                                $50                 $75

Online: www.sha.org
Until December 19, 2014: The link to the online registration system for the SHA 2015 Conference is posted the SHA website homepage. Instructions on how to register online will are available on the website.

Fax: 866.285.3512
Your completed registration form with your credit card payment information to SHA until December 19, 2014.

Mail
Your completed registration form and payment information (check or credit card) by December 19, 2014 to:

Society for Historical Archaeology
13017 Wisteria Drive #395
Germantown, MD 20874 USA

Conference Facilities and Hotel Accommodations
Sheraton Seattle Hotel
1400 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101

Phone Reservations: 1-800-204-6100

Online Reservations to Receive Conference Hotel Room Rate: https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/StarGroupsWeb/booking/reservation?id=140 8270530&key=12D5B991

A limited number of rooms are available at the conference rate of for single and double occupancy are $129 plus tax (15.6%) and a $2 per night tax assessment fee. Hotel amenities include an indoor pool and fitness center, bar and restaurants in the hotel, valet parking, and in-room hair dryer, safe, coffeemaker, and iron/ironing board. Note: the hotel has free wireless Internet in the hotel lobby or in-room Internet for a fee.

The “cutoff date” for reserving rooms in the Room Block at the negotiated room rate is 5:00 p.m. PST on Thursday, December 4, 2014. Rooms are filling up fast, so if you wish to stay at the conference hotel at the conference, do not hesitate reserve your soon!

Student Volunteer Positions are Available

Are you a student planning to attend the 2015 SHA conference in Seattle?

If so, you can receive free registration if you sign up to be a volunteer! For more information on volunteering and requirements for free registration, please visit the SHA annual meetings page and scroll down to SHA 2015 Volunteer Form.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email the volunteer director at SHA2015Volunteer@gmail.com

The Conference: Workshops and Tours

The 2015 conference will have FOUR preconference workshops. All workshops will be held on Wednesday, January 7, 2015.

W-01: Excavating the Image: The MUA Photoshop Workshop
Host: T. Kurt Knoerl (The Museum of Underwater Archaeology)
This Photoshop workshop covers basic photo-processing techniques useful to historians and archaeologists. We will cover correcting basic problems in photos taken underwater and on land, restoring detail to historic images, and preparation of images for publications. We will also cover the recovery of data from microfilm images such as handwritten letters. No previous Photoshop experience is needed, but you must bring your own laptop with Photoshop already installed on it (version 7 or newer). While images used for the workshop are provided by me, feel free to bring an image you’re interested in working on. Warning … restoring historic images can be addictive!
Full-day workshop: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 25
Cost: $80 for members, $105 for nonmembers, $50 for student members, and $70 for student nonmembers

W-02: Archaeological Illustration
Host: Jack Scott
Want your pen-and-ink drawings to look like the good ones? Pen and ink is all basically a matter of skill and technique which can be easily taught, and the results can be done faster and cheaper, and are considerably more attractive, than the black-and-white illustrations done on computer. Workshop participants will learn about materials and techniques, page design and layout, maps, lettering, scientific illustration conventions, problems posed by different kinds of artifacts, working size, reproduction concerns, ethics, and dealing with authors and publishers. A reading list and pen and paper (tracing vellum) will be provided, but feel free to bring your own pens, tools, books, and, of course, questions. Be ready to work!
Full-day workshop: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 30
Cost: $85 for members, $110 for nonmembers, $50 for student members, and $70 for student nonmembers

W-03: Underwater Cultural Heritage Resources Awareness Workshop
Host(s): The Advisory Council for Underwater Archaeology
Cultural resource managers, land managers, and archaeologists are often tasked with managing, interpreting, and reviewing archaeological assessments for submerged cultural resources. This workshop is designed to introduce nonspecialists to issues specific to underwater archaeology. Participants will learn about different types of underwater cultural heritage (UCH) sites, and the techniques used in Phase I and II equivalent surveys. This workshop is not intended to teach participants how to do underwater archaeology, but will introduce different investigative techniques, international best practices, and existing legislation. The purpose of this workshop is to assist nonspecialists in recognizing the potential for UCH resources in their areas of impact, budgeting for UCH resource investigations, reviewing UCH resource assessments, developing interpretive strategies, and providing sufficient background information to assist in making informed decisions regarding UCH resources.
Full-day workshop: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 25
Cost: $80 for members, $105 for nonmembers, $50 for student members, and $70 for student nonmembers

W-4: GMAC Anti-Racism Workshop
Hosts: Flordeliz T. Bugarin (Howard University), Michael S. Nassaney (Western Michigan University), and Dr. Emily Drew (Crossroads)
The Gender and Minority Affairs Committee, with the support of the SHA Board, has worked to identify racism in our organization and profession, develop strategies to transform our society, and strive towards a more diverse archaeological community. We recognize that a lack of diversity within our organization has negative outcomes on every member, and as such should be a central concern for all of us. In this effort and in collaboration with Crossroads, we have organized this workshop to show SHA members how to develop a systemic analysis of racism. The goal will be to assist us (both as individuals and as a society) in beginning and strengthening our institutional interventions against racism. During this workshop, trainers from Crossroads will expose SHA members to a common language and mode of analysis, which will in turn assist us in forming a transformation team to develop effective long- term strategies. Participants will learn how to develop and use a common language about racism, as well as a shared definition. We will discuss how to understand racism as a systemic issue in the United States and by extension throughout the world-and not only as an issue of individual attitudes and actions. We will also discuss the racialization of our discipline, both historically and in our contemporary practices of pedagogy and scholarship. A major goal of this workshop is to understand how racism and other policies act as barriers specifically to an all-inclusive SHA. This workshop will in turn explore approaches to dismantling racism that can provide the foundation for institutional interventions against systemic racism. Registration is free of charge, but space is limited, so please register in advance using the option provided on the conference registration form.
Afternoon Workshop: 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 40
Cost: Free of charge

Tours

This year’s Conference offers FIVE exciting tours. All tours will be held on Wednesday, January 7, 2015.

(T-1) Behind the Scenes Tour at the Burke Museum
Join the museum’s curators and explore the Burke Museum Archaeology Collections, which include more than one million objects from around the world and focus on cultural materials from the Pacific Rim. The Burke is best known for its collections of artifacts from the Lower Columbia River and the Puget Sound region of Washington State.

Three groups of 10 people each will receive a personal tour as follows:
• Group 1: Leave the Sheraton at 9:30 a.m., tour: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon; return to Sheraton at 12:30 p.m.
• Group 2: Leave the Sheraton at 10:30 a.m.; tour: 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.; return to Sheraton at 1:30 p.m.
• Group 3: Leave the Sheraton at 11:30 a.m.; tour 12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m.; return to Sheraton at 2:30 p.m.
Cost: $30 per person (includes transportation and admission to the Burke)

(T-2) Washington State Wine and Beer Tour
Tour Washington State’s Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery and enjoy a sample of its award-winning wines. Then you’ll travel a short distance to the Redhook Brewery for a walk-through of the state-of-the-art brewery, information about Redhook history, an overview of the brewing process, a tasting of some of Redhook’s beers, and a souvenir glass! There will also be time for lunch at your own expense at the Brewery’s Forecaster Pub.

Tour start time: 10:00 a.m. The bus will depart from the Sheraton and will return at 4:00 p.m. In the event of extremely inclement weather, the tour will be canceled and your fee refunded. Dress appropriately!

Maximum number of participants: 50

Cost: $50 per person (includes transportation and tour/ tasting fees at Chateau Ste. Michelle and the Redhook Brewery)

(T-3) Seattle Underground
Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour is a leisurely, guided, 75-minute, walking tour beneath Seattle’s sidewalks and streets. As you roam the subterranean passages that once were the main roadways and first-floor storefronts of old downtown Seattle, your guides will regale you with the stories our pioneers didn’t want you to hear. It’s history with a twist! The tour begins inside Doc Maynard’s Public House, a restored 1890s saloon. Following a short intro, you’ll walk through historic Pioneer Square to three different sections of Underground-about three blocks in all.

Tour start time: 2:00 p.m. The entrance to the Underground Tour is at 608 First Avenue in Seattle’s Pioneer Square, between Cherry Street and Yesler Way and approximately 1 mile (12 blocks) from the Sheraton Seattle. Transportation will NOT be provided with this tour.

Cost: $14 for adults (18-59 years old), $12 for students (with valid ID), $12 for seniors (60+). (These are discounted prices for the SHA tour.)

(T-4) Whidbey Island Tour
Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve is an historic rural landscape that includes stunning panoramas, historical communities, Fort Casey and Fort Ebey State Parks, and lands farmed by the descendants of families who filed Donation Claims in the 1850s. The reserve is located north of Seattle on Whidbey Island in Puget Sound and is unique within the National Park Service because most of the land is privately owned. A partnership of the landowners-federal, state, town, and county-provide support to the current community in the preservation of their cultural and natural legacy. This historic rural landscape preserves direct connections to many layers of Pacific Northwest history-Coast Salish peoples, English explorers and traders, American farmers and sea captains, and Chinese farmers. Whidbey Island is the largest jewel in the Puget Sound’s island crown. You’ll travel to Whidbey via bus and ferry. Lunch will be on your own at one of the restaurants on the island.

Tour start time: 9 a.m. The tour bus will depart from the Sheraton and will return by 5:00 p.m. In the event of extremely inclement weather, the tour will be canceled and your fee refunded. Dress appropriately!

Maximum number of participants: 50

Cost: $50 per person

(T-5) Beaux Arts and Art Deco Seattle Walking Tour

During the first quarter of the 20th century, Seattle, “Gateway to the Orient,” could boast of international trade, up-to-date skyscrapers, a thriving entertainment district, and a planned commercial center that would be the envy of other cities. This tour shows off brick- and terra-cotta- clad skyscrapers, private clubs, financial and banking headquarters, and commercial buildings, which expressed the confidence and sophistication of Seattle’s builders. The tour will be led by Larry Kreisman, Honorary AIA Seattle, architectural historian, author, preservation consultant, and since 1997, Program Director for Historic Seattle. He is the author of several books on Seattle’s architecture and history.

Tour start time: 1:00 p.m. This tour will leave from the main entrance of the Sheraton Seattle. Tour will take two to three hours. In the event of extremely inclement weather, the tour will be canceled. Dress appropriately.

Maximum number of participants: 30

Cost: $15 per person

 

 

Public Service Announcements and Archaeology: Protecting WWII-Caves in Saipan

By: Jennifer McKinnon

East Carolina University and Ships of Exploration and Discovery Research

The words public service announcements (PSAs) and archaeology are rarely uttered together. In fact, a quick search finds very few examples of archaeology or cultural heritage PSAs. Yet PSAs can be an effective way of reaching out to a very large audience to promote protection and preservation of heritage. A recent project that explored community consensus building for the protection of WWII-related caves on the island of Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands utilized radio and television PSAs for the purpose of sharing a message of protection and preservation of caves with the local island community.

In recent years, with more visitors, more development and more spelunking and exploration, natural and human-made caves that hold remnants of both ancient Chamorro culture and WWII history are being more heavily impacted. This activity was brought to the attention of the local community and archaeologists when videos and photographs of cave exploration, artifacts and rock art began appearing on blogs, Flicker and YouTube. This concerned local community members and as a result, a project was created to assess community interest in protecting these resources. Funded by an American Battlefield Protection Program grant, the project consisted of community meetings, landowner consultation and interviews, archaeological survey of caves on private and public lands, development of radio and television PSAs and ultimately the creation of a preservation plan with input from the community.

Why PSAs? The idea of a public service announcement came to me while I was on the island for another project and got a catchy little jingle in my head – “Don’t give snakes a break.” I don’t know the first time I heard it on the radio, but it certainly impacted my subconscious because there I was singing it as I was driving down the road. Had I seen a snake, I probably wouldn’t have given it a “brake.” Brown Tree Snakes are an invasive snake that wiped out indigenous bird populations on Guam, and Saipan has worked hard to prevent and eradicate its presence. In fact, a PSA project raising awareness about brown tree snakes had remarkable results in eradicating them from the island. Bumper stickers, radio jingles, TV commercials, and special events were all part of the plan to raise awareness.

Sooo….when thinking of how we could get the message out to local landowners about how important the caves were to their history as well as that of the wider world, PSAs seemed the best option. Print options like brochures or mailings are limited in that they are generally viewed once and when they are distributed or out of print, they no longer exist. PSAs on the other hand can be aired and thus viewed over and over again, reinforcing the content’s message. When aired during peak time slots such as the evening news, they can become even more effective. For a Pacific island that relies on television primarily for its news, PSAs serve to reach the widest possible audience. In addition, radio PSAs can reinforce and even reach a younger generation of stakeholders.

The creation of PSAs were only one part of the larger cave heritage project but their development built upon all aspects. Landowners who came to the meetings to voice their opinions were invited to participate in the PSAs. They also opened their properties to the archaeological team who visited various caves to get a picture of what types of caves exist, what history they may hold and what is impacting them. Finally, many community members participated in interviews during which they related their and their family’s stories about caves use during WWII. Ultimately the message, “Our History, Our Stories” was chosen as the tagline for the PSAs to reflect the multiplicity of connections the community had to caves. Caves on the island of Saipan provided shelter to the ancient culture when they arrived thousands of years ago, they were the canvas on which the ancient peoples communicated  through rock art and served as their burial grounds. During the war, families used the caves for shelter from bombs and bullets and today they still serve special purposes such as places of commemoration and memorialization. As community member Fred Camacho relates, “This has become part of our family album, and we have the obligation to protect it.”

View all of the PSAs at Ships of Discovery’s YouTube Page.

SHA’s New Professional Membership Category

by Kimberly Pyszka

Graduating and beginning your career as a professional historical archaeologist can be stressful – writing and defending your thesis or dissertation, applying for jobs, looking into student loan repayment options, and likely moving once you do find a job. Financially, this time of transition can be unstable and honestly, a bit scary. On top of everything else you realize that you no longer qualify for SHA’s discounted student membership rate. For many recent grads, including myself, the costs of renewing as a “Regular” member may seem daunting. You may even make you think twice about renewing your SHA membership at a time when membership benefits are the most valuable to you.

But don’t fear or throw out your membership renewal notice! Beginning in 2014 SHA began providing an alternative for recent grads, as well as others who are entering the profession for the first time, to help them bridge the financial gap between the Student member rate ($80 annually) and the Regular member rate ($135 annually).To quality for the “New Professional” member rate ($105 annually) you must have graduated and/or gained employment in historical archaeology within the past five years. New professionals can take advantage of this special rate for up to two years.

So if you’re a recent grad and/or joining the ranks of professional historical archaeologists, we encourage you to take advantage of this new membership category!