About Terry Brock

Terry is a PhD Candidate at MIchigan State University, and is currently conducting his dissertation research at Historic St. Mary's City in Southern Maryland. He is currently the Chair of SHA's Technology Social Media Subcommittee. You can visit his personal blog at Dirt or read his posts at the Inside Higher Ed Blog Gradhacker.

Help Celebrate Our Past: Work with the SHA History Committee

Did you know the SHA turns 50 in January 2017?

Members of the SHA’s History Committee are very excited about this landmark anniversary, as it is our responsibility to document and share the history of the SHA. In the past, we have done this primarily by recording and publishing oral histories of past SHA presidents, Harrington Award recipients, and other significant contributors to the society and discipline. We continue to fulfill this important responsibility. But we are also buzzing with ideas of how to share more of the SHA’s history in celebration of the society’s upcoming 50th anniversary. The possibilities and opportunities are virtually endless, but we need interested and enthusiastic individuals to help us envision and implement them.

For example, we recognize the great potential of social media to share the fascinating history of the SHA and promote the upcoming 50th anniversary celebrations. But we need an able and willing individual to serve as our liaison with the Social Media Committee – someone who can represent the History Committee’s interests and coordinate our social media efforts.

Other ideas for how the SHA’s history can be shared and celebrated include:
• Working with the society’s publications team to create a special publication on the history of the SHA for the society’s 50th anniversary. This volume would include previously published oral histories, as well as papers and articles that specifically discuss the history of the SHA and the discipline. Ideally, this special anniversary publication would be paired with, and promoted by, a celebratory session at the 2017 conference in Dallas, Texas (see below).
• Hosting and organizing a special session at the 2017 conference. Speakers for this session would highlight the history and future of the society and the discipline.
• Working with the National Anthropological Archives, where the SHA archives are stored, to curate a small exhibit of significant SHA documents and artifacts for display at the 2017 conference.
Collecting “mini” oral histories from those attending the 2015 and 2016 conferences and sharing these as part of celebratory events at the 2017 conference.

If you want to be involved in these and other exciting endeavors to celebrate the SHA’s history for the upcoming 50th anniversary, we invite you to attend this year’s History Committee meeting. The meeting will be held at 12:00 noon on Saturday, January 10 in the Kirkland Room (3rd floor of the Sheraton Seattle Hotel).

Please come and participate in the exciting work of the History Committee. Together we can experience “history-in-the-making” as we document and share the significant history of the SHA and celebrate the society’s 50th anniversary.

If you have additional ideas, suggestions, or questions, please contact Ben Pykles, chair of the History Committee, at pykles@gmail.com.

Tell your Stories: #SHAStories at #SHA2015

Did you know the SHA is turning 50 in January 2017? In anticipation of the big anniversary, the History and Technology Committees want to hear your SHA stories. At this year’s conference in Seattle, committee members will be set up and ready to record your SHA stories in the Technology Room (Ballard, 3rd floor) on Thursday and Friday, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm. Please stop by and spend a few minutes sharing your SHA story.

Not sure what you would say? Don’t think you have anything meaningful to share? Nonsense! Just answer one or more of the following questions and you’ll be on your way! You can come by yourself and chat with one of our interviewers, or bring a colleague and go back and forth!

  • When did you join the SHA?
  • Why did you join?
  • What was the first SHA conference you attended?
  • What is your favorite memory of a SHA conference?
  • Why do you like the SHA?
  • What difference has the SHA made in your career?
  • And any other SHA story you want to share!

The best stories will be compiled into a special presentation and featured at the 50th anniversary conference in January 2017. The more stories we record, the more meaningful the birthday bash will be!  So please stop by the Technology Room and spend a few moments in the recording booth sharing your stories. We want to hear from everyone!

Follow along on Twitter with #SHAStories to see who is taking part!

#SHA2015: Using Social Media at the SHA Conference

Over the past few years, SHA has built an online presence through the use of social media, and it began within the conference committee. With the addition of the blog, and the society’s developing use of Twitter and Facebook, we want to encourage you all to incorporate social media into your conference experience in Seattle. Since 2012, we’ve been using social media at our conferences, to great success particularly in the past few years. They are a great way to improve your conference experience, while also demonstrating the value of the SHA to archaeology and scholars of the past.

Before the Conference

Using social media before the conference provides a number of opportunities to make your experience in Seattle more enjoyable. Here’s some suggestions:

  1. Catch Up with What’s Happening: We have a Facebook PageConference Event Page, a Twitter Account, and official Twitter Hashtag.  Follow and Like Us, and read up on what to expect at the conference!
  2. Start Communicating: Twitter is a great way to meet other archaeologists. See who is tweeting with the #SHA2015 tag, and start conversations with them!
  3. Advertise your session by blogging and posting: Do you have a blog? Use it to share your session, the reasons why it is important, where and what time it’s being held. Post it on our Facebook wall and send a tweet with #SHA2015 and @SHA_org mentioned, and we’ll share it with our members!
  4. Share Your Trip: Let us know what’s happening on your trip to Seattle. Did you find a good travel deal? Need someone to share a ride with from the airport? Delayed? Lost? Send a tweet with the #SHA2015 tag and see if someone can lend a hand.

At the Conference

Once you arrive in Seattle, use @SHA_org and our Facebook page to communicate with the conference committee; we’ll be using it to communicate with you. Here are some things we’ll be using social media for:

What we’ll be doing

  1. Announcing special events: We’ll send out reminders about events including the awards banquet, student reception and so on, so you don’t miss anything! We’ll also live-tweet and post from the Business Meeting, so those of you leaving early on Saturday can follow along from the train.
  2. Special Announcements: If something is relocated, delayed, or cancelled, we will announce this via social media.
  3. Answering Questions: Send your questions to @SHA_org or the Facebook page
  4. RTing and RePosting: We’ll repost on Facebook and ReTweet on Twitter the things you share on the #SHA2015 hashtag. If you’ve taken a great picture, made an interesting comment in a session, or provided some good information, we want to make sure our followers see it!

What you can do

  1. Wear a Twitter Sticker: When you collect your conference bag, ask a volunteer for a Twitter Sticker. Then write your Twitter name on it, and stick it to your name badge or wear it separately. This way, other Twitter users will know you Tweet.
  2. Post YOUR Special Announcements: Has something happened in your session that is delaying things? Have you found a great restaurant or coffee shop you want to share? Spotted your book in the book room? Post these items and we’ll repost them so others can see them.
  3. Ask Questions: Use Twitter and Facebook to ask questions about the conference. Can’t find a room? Can’t remember what time the Awards Banquet is? Send a tweet to @SHA_org or post on the Facebook wall and we’ll get back to you.
  4. Take Pictures: we’d love to see and share your pictures from the conference, particularly from the special event.

In A Session

Twitter can be particularly useful when you’re in a session. It provides a backchannel of commentary and discussion, so people who couldn’t attend the session or conference can still follow along. It also gives presenters and chairs a chance to get some feedback on their presentation, and to communicate with the audience – leading to interactions and relationships that might not have occurred otherwise. Here are some tips to maximize the effectiveness, and civility, of Twitter. You can find more hints and tips here.

For Session organizers

  1. Use a Hashtag: It’s OK with us if you give your session its own hashtag; this way, it is clear what tweets belong to what section. We STRONGLY advise that you also use the #SHA2015 hashtag, so that people following it will see your session as well. Otherwise, it may not be noticed. So, pick something short to save characters!
  2. Make it Known: Make sure all your presenters know about the hashtag, and that you’d like to use social media during the session. Make sure that the audience knows as well; tell them as you introduce the session. Also, encourage your presenters to include their own Twitter name and the session hashtag on their introduction slide, so that people can use it during their presentation.

For Presenters

  1. Be Loud: include your Twitter name on your presentation slides, and say something in your introduction about how you’d like to hear feedback on Twitter. If you DON’T want anyone to broadcast your session, make the request at the beginning of your presentation.
  2. Respond: Be sure to respond to the comments that you get, and build relationships!
  3. Pay it Forward: Be an active tweeter during the session for your fellow presenters.

For the audience

  1. Be Respectful: Don’t tweet anything you wouldn’t say to a presenter’s face; Twitter is, in general, a friendly place. Constructive criticism is certainly welcome, but remember you only have 140 characters. It’s probably best to send the presenter a private message saying you’d love to chat about their presentation rather than publicly dig into them. If a presenter requests silence on social media for their presentation, respect it and give your thumbs a rest.
  2. Introduce your Speaker: It’s courteous to send a tweet out introducing the presenter and their paper topic before starting to tweet their presentation: this gives those following some context.
  3. Cite: Use the presenter’s Twitter name, surname, or initials in all the following tweets so that their ideas are connected to them. Use quotes if you’re directly quoting someone from their presentation, and be sure to include their name. Remember: these presentations are still the presenter’s intellectual property, so treat it respectfully!

After the Conference

Just because a conference is over, it doesn’t mean the work is done! The same goes for social media; here’s how you can round out your conference experience:

  1. Write a Summary: Use a blog or Storify to give other archaeologists a glimpse into your experience, session or paper, and see what they missed. This also allows us to gather feedback about the conference so we can make it better next year! Be sure to post it on Twitter, use the #SHA2015 tag, and post on our Facebook page so others can see it!
  2. Post your Paper: Using a blog or academia.edu to post your paper is a great way to make it available to everyone. Or you could make a video; simply record yourself talking over your slides and upload it to YouTube or Vimeo (read more about this here). Then, share it with us!
  3. Build your Networks: Build longer lasting relationships by looking up the people you’ve met at the conference on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn (oh, we have a LinkedIn Group, too, just for SHA members). If you find them, send them a message saying how nice it was to see them!