About Terry Brock

Terry is a PhD Candidate at MIchigan State University, and is currently conducting his dissertation research at Historic St. Mary's City in Southern Maryland. He is currently the Chair of SHA's Technology Social Media Subcommittee. You can visit his personal blog at Dirt or read his posts at the Inside Higher Ed Blog Gradhacker.

GMAC Diversity Photo Competition

This year at the SHA Annual Conference, GMAC will be holding a diversity photo competition. The competition is part of a broader effort by the SHA to promote and encourage a more diverse SHA. The purpose of this photo competition is to display how we as historical archaeologists embrace diversity as an essential part of what we do as anthropologists. Photos should demonstrate the views of the photographer of how they view diversity in their day to day interactions as a practicing anthropologist and archaeologist, but not limited to gender, age, ethnicity, or just standardized ideas of diversity.  The role of the photographer to explain how and why their photo represents diversity with the goal of expanding how diversity can be and is viewed.

General criteria

  1. The contest is open to all SHA members
  2. The Contest Opens On November 20th 2014
  3. The Deadline for Entry is December 15th 2013
  4. Photos must have been taken between January 1 2012 and November 2013 to be eligible for entry.
  5. Winners will be announced at the 2014 SHA Meeting in Quebec City.
  6. Only individual entries will be accepted.  No group entries.
  7. Only one entry per person.

Submission Criteria

  1. Submitted image must be an original photo (with only brightness and/or contrast adjusted) taken by the person who enters the photo for consideration in the contest. The image must tell a story about how and why historical archaeology embraces diversity within the profession, the field and society.
  2. In addition to a photo, you must submit a title for your photo and a maximum 200-word description of your photo. This description, along with your photo, will be used by the panel of judges to select the top three winning entries as well as up to three honorable mention winners if so needed.
  3. A people’s choice winner will also be selected by vote of SHA members selecting the picture the like as displayed on the SHA Facebook page.
  4. Photo should be a TIFF or JPG format large enough to create at least and 8” x 11” photo for display.  Print resolution should be no less than 1600 x 1200 pixels minimum.  If you are looking at camera megapixels it should be no less than 6+ megapixels capture resolution.
  5. Submissions for the contest should be posted to the following box link folder by the deadline by no later than Midnight PST.  https://app.box.com/s/wruf7p7onc668hq5cely
  6. All Photos will also be placed on the SHA Facebook page and the one receiving the highest number of ‘Likes’ will be selected as a People’s Choice Winner

Winners’ Criteria

Owner retains copyright of submitted image. If your photo is selected as a place winner or an honorable mention, you give The Society for Historical Archaeology and The Gender and Minority Affairs Committee permission to use your photo’s in future publications whether print or digital and to publish your photo on the SHA website (www.sha.org/) and/or in the SHA Newsletter or Blog.

Winners Prize

The Winning Photographers

  1. Receive a certificate signed by the SHA President announcing their achievement
  2. Will be published in an upcoming issue of the SHA Newsletter, be featured on the SHA Facebook Page and Blog, and Publicly Displayed at the 2014 SHA Meeting in Quebec City.

Submit questions about the GMAC 2013 Photo Contest to Lewis Jones, SHA GMAC Photo Contest Committee Chair, via email at lecjones@indiana.edu.

SHA 2013: Social Media at the SHA Conference

Over the past few years, SHA has built an online presence through the use of social media, and it began within the conference committee. This year, with the addition of the blog, and the society’s developing use of Twitter and Facebook, we want to encourage you all to incorporate social media into your conference experience in Leicester. You can find further information about the use of social media at conferences in general here and here.

Before the Conference

Using social media before the conference provides a number of opportunities to make your experience in Leicester more enjoyable. Here’s some suggestions:

  1. Catch Up with What’s Happening: We have a Facebook Page, Conference Event Page, a Twitter Account, and official Twitter Hashtag. We’ve also been posting blogs about Leicester and the conference since January. Follow and Like Us, and read up on what to expect at the conference!
  2. Start Communicating: Twitter is a great way to meet other archaeologists. See who is tweeting with the #SHA2013 tag, and start conversations with them!
  3. Advertise your session by blogging and posting: Do you have a blog? Use it to share your session, the reasons why it is important, where and what time it’s being held. Post it on our Facebook wall and send a tweet with #SHA2013 and @SHA_org mentioned, and we’ll share it with our members!
  4. Share Your Trip: Let us know what’s happening on your trip to Leicester. Did you find a good travel deal? Need someone to share a ride with from the airport? Delayed? Lost? Send a tweet with the #SHA2013 tag and see if someone can lend a hand.

At the Conference

Once you arrive in Leicester, use @SHA_org and our Facebook page to communicate with the conference committee; we’ll be using it to communicate with you. Here are some things we’ll be using social media for:

What we’ll be doing

  1. Announcing special events: We’ll send out reminders about events including the awards banquet, student reception and so on, so you don’t miss anything! We’ll also live-tweet and post from the Business Meeting, so those of you leaving early on Saturday can follow along from the train.
  2. Special Announcements: If something is relocated, delayed, or cancelled, we will announce this via social media.
  3. Answering Questions: Send your questions to @SHA_org or the Facebook page
  4. RTing and RePosting: We’ll repost on Facebook and ReTweet on Twitter the things you share on the #SHA2013 hashtag. If you’ve taken a great picture, made an interesting comment in a session, or provided some good information, we want to make sure our followers see it!

What you can do

  1. Wear a Twitter Sticker: When you collect your conference bag, ask a volunteer for a Twitter Sticker. Then write your Twitter name on it, and stick it to your name badge or wear it separately. This way, other Twitter users will know you Tweet.
  2. Post YOUR Special Announcements: Has something happened in your session that is delaying things? Have you found a great restaurant or coffee shop you want to share? Spotted your book in the book room? Post these items and we’ll repost them so others can see them.
  3. Ask Questions: Use Twitter and Facebook to ask questions about the conference. Can’t find a room? Can’t remember what time the Awards Banquet is? Send a tweet to @SHA_org or post on the Facebook wall and we’ll get back to you.
  4. Take Pictures: we’d love to see and share your pictures from the conference, particularly from the special events.
  5. Come to our TweetUp! There will be a special gathering at a local watering hole that is open to all, but particularly for those who use social media! This is a great chance to meet those you’ve come to know on Twitter or Facebook, but never met face-to-face. Stay tuned for more details! UPDATE: The TweetUp will be Thursday at 9 pm, after the Pub Quiz at the Marquis. See the Facebook Event here for more info.

In a Session

Twitter can be particularly useful when you’re in a session. It provides a backchannel of commentary and discussion, so people who couldn’t attend the session or conference can still follow along. It also gives presenters and chairs a chance to get some feedback on their presentation, and to communicate with the audience – leading to interactions and relationships that might not have occurred otherwise. Here are some tips to maximize the effectiveness, and civility, of Twitter. You can find more hints and tips here.

For Session organizers

  1. Use a Hashtag: It’s OK with us if you give your session its own hashtag; this way, it is clear what tweets belong to what section. We STRONGLY advise that you also use the #SHA2013 hashtag, so that people following it will see your session as well. Otherwise, it may not be noticed. So, pick something short to save characters!
  2. Make it Known: Make sure all your presenters know about the hashtag, and that you’d like to use social media during the session. Make sure that the audience knows as well; tell them as you introduce the session. Also, encourage your presenters to include their own Twitter name and the session hashtag on their introduction slide, so that people can use it during their presentation.

For Presenters

  1. Be Loud: include your Twitter name on your presentation slides, and say something in your introduction about how you’d like to hear feedback on Twitter. If you DON’T want anyone to broadcast your session, make the request at the beginning of your presentation.
  2. Respond: Be sure to respond to the comments that you get, and build relationships!
  3. Pay it Forward: Be an active tweeter during the session for your fellow presenters.

For the audience

  1. Be Respectful: Don’t tweet anything you wouldn’t say to a presenter’s face; Twitter is, in general, a friendly place. Constructive criticism is certainly welcome, but remember you only have 140 characters. It’s probably best to send the presenter a private message saying you’d love to chat about their presentation rather than publicly dig into them. If a presenter requests silence on social media for their presentation, respect it and give your thumbs a rest.
  2. Introduce your Speaker: It’s courteous to send a tweet out introducing the presenter and their paper topic before starting to tweet their presentation: this gives those following some context.
  3. Cite: Use the presenter’s Twitter name, surname, or initials in all the following tweets so that their ideas are connected to them. Use quotes if you’re directly quoting someone from their presentation, and be sure to include their name. Remember: these presentations are still the presenter’s intellectual property, so treat it respectfully!

After the Conference

Just because a conference is over, it doesn’t mean the work is done! The same goes for social media; here’s how you can round out your conference experience:

  1. Write a Summary: Use a blog or Storify to give other archaeologists a glimpse into your experience, session or paper, and see what they missed. This also allows us to gather feedback about the conference so we can make it better next year! Be sure to post it on Twitter, use the #SHA2013 tag, and post on our Facebook page so others can see it!
  2. Post your Paper: Using a blog or academia.edu to post your paper is a great way to make it available to everyone. Or you could make a video; simply record yourself talking over your slides and upload it to YouTube or Vimeo (read more about this here). Then, share it with us!
  3. Build your Networks: Build longer lasting relationships by looking up the people you’ve met at the conference on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn (oh, we have a LinkedIn Group, too, just for SHA members). If you find them, send them a message saying how nice it was to see them!

Friday Links: What’s happened in Historical Archaeology

This week’s photo of the month was provided by Mark Kostro of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. For ten weeks this summer, students enrolled in the annual Colonial Williamsburg / College of William and Mary field school in historical archaeology searched for evidence of the 18th-century Bray School, an institution dedicated to the education of free and enslaved African American children.  Between 1760 and 1765, the Bray School was housed within a wood frame dwelling house (a.k.a. Dudley Digges House) located two short blocks north of campus.  Probably constructed in the mid-eighteenth century, the Digges House survived, although substantially altered, at this location until 1930 when it was moved to make way for the construction of a new residence hall.  Among this summer’s discoveries was an eighteenth-century brick-lined well, a late eighteenth-century earthfast building located in what would have been the rear yard of the Digges House, and numerous artifacts not only from the Bray School period, but also from the various occupants of the lot before and after the Bray School was located there.  Co-directing the archaeological fieldwork is Mark Kostro of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and Dr. Neil Norman of the College of William and Mary.  The Bray School Archaeological Project is one of the topics being investigated by the Lemon Project, an ongoing scholarly initiative at William & Mary focused on the 300-year relationship between African Americans and the College.

You can learn more about the excavations and see additional photographs at the Colonial Williamsburg Archaeology Facebook page.

Also, we are pleased to announce that Poplar Forest has launched a social media campaign: you can now read their new blog, become a fan of their Facebook Page, and follow them on Twitter!

This Week’s Links

The SHA lost one of our finest leaders: Roderick Sprague passed away this week. Dr. Sprague served as president of our society for two terms, in addition to winning the J.C. Harrington Medial in 1996 and the Carol Ruppe Service Award in 2004.

Paul Mullins, on his blog Archaeology and Material Culture, discusses the archaeology and politics of Ruin Porn.

The South Central Historical Archaeology Conference has a call for papers out for their conference at the University of South Alabama.

Bernard Means writes up a review of the THATCamp in Computational Archaeology that was held a few weeks ago at the University of Virginia.

Craig Lukezic writes a post about the search for Delaware’s 17th Century Fort Casimir.

Read this piece by George Miller and Robert Hunter at chipstone.org: “How Creamware Got the Blues: The Origins of China Glaze and Pearlware”

Archaeologists at William and Mary Center for Archaeological Research have found Civil War encampments on the college’s property.

Do you have any links that you’d like us to share? Please send them are way by posting them on our Facebook wall or mentioning @SHA_Org in a tweet!