Friday Links: What’s Happening in Historical Archaeology

This week’s photo was discovered via the Mount Vernon’s Mystery Midden Facebook Page, where a great conversation has ensued about the objects! The photo is of a collection of mugs excavated from a midden site located at George Washington’s Mount Vernon. The site dates from ca 1735-1775. Ware types seen are the Manganese Mottled earthenware, Nottingham stoneware, White Salt-glazed stoneware, White Slip-dipped stoneware, and William Roger’s stoneware. The photo itself was taken by Karen Price, who serves as Historic Mount Vernon’s Photography Intern (learn more about Mt. Vernon’s Internship opportunities here). Thanks to Mount Vernon and their Mystery Midden for letting us share this photo with you!

Headlines

The First Colony Foundation has new historical evidence that may point to the location of Walter Raleigh’s lost colony.

Archaeologists are digging at the site of 18th century Fort Richmond.

Archaeologists at Monticello have discovered two possible slave quarter sites.

Call for Papers, Manuscripts

The Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage is looking for submissions.

The Computer Applications in Archaeology (CAA) North America Chapter is hosting an Archaeology THATCamp on Friday, August 10, 2012, and are looking for participants for the digitally-oriented “un” conference.

The Society for Historical Archaeology (that’s us!) has officially opened the Call for Papers for SHA 2013 in Leicester, England.

Publications

The first issue of The Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage is now out.

New on Facebook and Twitter

tDAR, the Digital Archaeological Record, is now on Twitter.

The Arkansas Archaeological Society is now on Facebook.

The Blogosphere

The Fairfield Foundation discusses their recent flood in the lab, and asks for contributions to protect their archaeological resources and public programming during this disaster.

There’s a new blog in town: check out “Archaeology on the Alley”, a look at excavations being carried out in Philadelphia.

Read about the reanalysis of a religious medal found at the Santa Barbara Presidio by the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation Blog.

The Archaeology Dude discusses recent discovery of the Snowdun Vulcan Iron and Machine Works in Pennsylvania.

What You Missed in Historical Archaeology: Friday Links

This week’s Photo of the Week is from Jennifer Poulson, the Archaeological Collections Manager at the Massachusetts Historical Commission. The image is of a shoe found in an archaeological deposit in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, dating between December 1895 and January 1896. The image was part of her Master’s thesis research from the University of Massachusetts-Boston, which can be read in-full here. We found the image while perusing the City of Boston Archaeology Program Facebook page, which includes a number of other photos and updates from archaeological work in the field.

Headlines

Archaeologists and community in Ireland working together to map and preserve graveyards.

Archaeologists Jim Gibb and Scott Lawrence are looking for 1662 chapel in Newtone Neck, Maryland.

In Middletown, CT, archaeologists are uncovering an influential African American community from the late 19th century.

Resources

The Digital Scholars Lab at University of Richmond has released Visualizing Emancipation, a new resource for mapping documents relating to emancipation during the Civil War.

World Archaeology has released their most recent issue discussing the archaeology of Sport.

Fort St. Joseph has announced their Summer lecture series.

The College of William and Mary and Colonial Williamsburg are offering a Field School in the Methods of Vernacular Architectural History.

The Blogs!

Scott Tucker discusses his preliminary research in the St. Mary’s River at Historic St. Mary’s City.

In two posts, Random Acts of Science discusses pacing and map drawing.

At Dirt, I look at Visualizing Emancipation as an important research tool.

What You May Have Missed at the SHA Blog

We’ve been active here at SHA Social for three months, and have been elated by the response thus far. Since many of our readers have only joined us recently, we thought we’d highlight some of our most popular posts from January and February, that you may have missed.

One of our first posts was by Carol McDavid, whose Current Topics essay examined an often forgotten part of publicly engaged archaeology: what happens when the project is over? 

Our Technology Week included three essays discussing different technological applications for historical archaeology: Rob Church looked at AUV camera capabilities for underwater archaeology, Angela Jaillet-Wentling asked questions about LiDAR applications, and Bernard Means discussed the applications of 3D scanning.

Quentin Lewis and Paul Mullins both wrote posts discussing the importance of contemporary archaeology in historical archaeology.

Valerie Hall took us on a trip through the SHA Conference’s Public Archaeology Day with her family, discussing the many opportunities available for the public during our annual conference.

Lastly, the publications committee offered a free pdf in their preview of last quarter’s Historical Archaeology, which examined the archaeologies of poverty.

Thanks again for reading and sharing our posts! We hope you take the time subscribe, comment, and follow along on Facebook and Twitter.