SHA 2015 Seattle: Food and Drink Blog

Besides plenty of stimulating intellectual discourse, what do archaeologists need to make their conference experience complete? Why good food and drink of course (perhaps not in that order)! Luckily there could hardly be a more convenient location than downtown
Seattle to put some of the best there is from coffee to cocktails and accompanying nosh right within walking distance. There are tens if not hundreds of options in the general vicinity and while there are many a solid chain, we thought we’d let you know about some unique-to-Seattle options for a more authentic experience of the city.

Breakfast/Coffee

The Sheraton is located just blocks from the famed and historic Pike Place Market, so head in that direction at breakfast or lunchtime and you’ll be sure to find something to suit your tastes. That said, it can be quite the busy spot for obvious reasons (like it’s nearly the top tourist attraction in the city) so don’t be surprised by crowds or lines. January being the off-season though, things should be calm enough to enjoy wandering about and you should actually be able to get food in a timely manner.

Ok, so Starbucks is ubiquitous pretty much everywhere, but nowhere more so than here in its hometown. If you want a “unique” Starbucks experience, Pike Place is home to the mega chain’s original location.

For a non-Starbucks coffee experience at Pike Place, try Seattle Coffee Works.

Monorail Espresso, closer to the Sheraton near the corner of Pike and 5th is a walk-up window serving up what’s raved about as some of the best in the city. Cash only.

Café ABoDegas on 6th between Union and University has freshly made breakfast sandwiches and pastries. Lunch too.

Lunch

Back at Pike Place, there is just about every type of cuisine to choose from come lunchtime.

To take advantage of the readily available fruits of the sea, try Pike Place Chowder. The lines is usually among the longest here, but join the other tourists, their offerings live up to the hype.

Beechers Handmade Cheese offers soups sandwiches and their famous mac and cheese along with a huge selection of, surprise, artisnal cheeses. You can even watch it being made right on site.

Back up near the Sheraton, Umma’s Lunchbox is a much raved about Korean buffet inside the Rainier Square shopping mall located below the iconic Rainier Tower.

Drinks/Dinner

For a pint at the end of the day, the Tap House Grill on 6th between Pike and Pine has 160 beers on tap, good place to sample some of the craft brew the Northwest is renowned for.

For really outstanding cocktails, venture to the other side of Pike Place. Tucked away facing onto the Harbor Steps leading down to the waterfront is the Zig Zag Café. Lots of ambiance and excellent food too.

For that special dinner made up of unabated views of Elliott Bay and the Olympic Mountains (on a clear day, fingers crossed) and all the kinds of Northwest seafood including more types of oysters than you perhaps knew existed, venture down to the waterfront to Elliott’s Oyster House.

Coming up, we’ll provide you with more info/recommendations if you’re interested in striking out further afield in the city during your stay.

SHA 2015 Seattle Preliminary Program Part 2: Roundtable Luncheons and Public Archaeology Session

A continuation of the events at the 2015 SHA conference in Seattle:

ROUNDTABLE LUNCHEONS

The roundtable luncheons are scheduled from 12:00 noon to 1:30 p.m. in the Sheraton Hotel on Thursday and Friday. A minimum of six participants per table applies to all roundtables. Maximum of 10 participants for each roundtable. All roundtable luncheons will cost $30.

Thursday, January 8, 2015

RL-1 Jobs in Nautical Archaeology

Leader: Paul Johnston (Smithsonian Institution)

What are the different job types and career tracks in nautical archaeology? This discussion will examine public archaeology (NOAA, National Park Service, MMS, Parks Canada, state programs, etc.), private-sector cultural resource management (contract archaeology, consulting), private foundations, academic positions and museum work (public and private), and treasure hunting. We’ll talk about the advantages and disadvantages of these various enterprises, as well as prospects in these fields.

RL-2 Public Archaeology in the Pacific Northwest

Leader: Doug Wilson (Northwest Cultural Resources Institute and Ft. Vancouver National Historic Site)

Participants will discuss public archaeology programs in the Pacific Northwest, including the use of field schools, public engagement events, and archaeology month programs. Participants will explore ways of engaging the public and descendant communities and means to evaluate programs for effectiveness.

RL-3 The Archaeology of World War II

Leaders: Stacey Camp (University of Idaho) and Jodi Barnes (University of Arkansas, Arkansas Archeological Survey)

This session will explore the historical archaeology of World War II. Potential discussion topics will include artifact identification, methodological challenges, useful theoretical models for interpreting World War II archaeological sites, and artifact patterning across different types of sites.

RL-4 Numismatic Archaeology  

Leader: James C. Bard (Cardno ENTRIX)

The intent of the luncheon is to bring together professionals interested in the recovery and interpretation of coins and tokens from archaeological sites. The roundtable hopes to promote greater understanding of the interpretive potential of coins and tokens, as there is more to these artifacts than simple description and dating. The luncheon is an opportunity to explore the many interpretive possibilities of coins and to connect with others who are working with this common, yet under analyzed, class of material culture.

Friday, January 9, 2015

RL-5 How to Get Published in Historical Archaeology

Leader: Meredith Morris-Babb (University Press of Florida)

This roundtable luncheon will offer some practical advice to prospective authors on navigating the publication process from submission to publication. The format is flexible and participants should feel free to come with questions or concerns. Possible topics can include the peer review process, publication ethics, marketing and social media, and the logistics of digital publishing.

RL-6 Exploring Chinese Healthcare Practices through an Archaeological Lens

Leader: Sarah Heffner (PAR Environmental Services)

Small, aqua Chinese medicine vials are ubiquitous on Asian American archaeological sites and are frequently viewed as the most representative type of material culture associated with Chinese medicinal practices. Interpretation of these vials in the archaeological literature is often limited, and they receive little mention other than as entries in an artifact catalog as “Chinese medicine bottle,” or “Chinese medicine vial.” In reality, Chinese medical practitioners utilized a wide range of medical devices and ingredients (plant, animal, mineral) for both internal and external applications. Only fairly recently have historical archaeologists begun to include discussions of other forms of material culture and faunal/floral remains that may.

RL-7 Tips for Finding a Job in Archaeology

Leader: William A. White, III (University of Arizona)

What do you need to do to land your dream job in archaeology? That is a question most archaeologists spend their entire careers answering. From the entry-level archaeological technician to the most venerated professor, we all need to learn how to find and successfully land a job in our chosen career field. In this luncheon, we will discuss the three most important things you need in order to land an archaeology job: deciphering job postings, writing a killer resume and cover letter, and building your professional network. Attendees should bring a copy of their resume and an example of a job posting for a position that they would like to have. Be prepared to build a strategy for career success.

RL-8 Historical Archaeology and CRM in the Pacific Northwest: Challenges and Opportunities

Leader: Lorelea Hudson (SWCA Environment Consultants) and Robert Weaver (Environmental History Co.)

Historical archaeologists working in the Pacific Northwest face challenges that are somewhat unique to the region. We have few people working in CRM who were directly trained in an academic historical program. In addition, politicians and bureaucrats focus almost exclusively on prehistory as archaeology. Even among practicing professionals, there is a bias against historical sites, in part due to the fact that our sites are “too recent”-mostly from the 1850s onward. Compliance review processes are inconsistent, and the laws are antiquated. The intent of this luncheon is to bring together professionals working in CRM from various parts of the country to discuss how we might begin to address some of these problems and work towards raising consciousness and improving standards for historic sites in the Northwest Plenary Session.

 

PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY SESSION

The Public Archaeology Session will be held on Saturday, January 10, 2015 at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Washington, in conjunction with its annual Public Archaeology Day.

Archaeology Day is a family-friendly event featuring Northwest archaeologists, educational displays, and activities geared toward a general audience.  The Burke has produced this event annually for over 12 years and it regularly draws more than 600 visitors to the museum. SHA- registered guests are admitted free to the Burke Museum, with their conference credentials, anytime during the week of the conference. This event will open at 10:00 a.m. and conclude at 4:00 p.m.

Bus service will be provided between the Sheraton Seattle and the Burke Museum. A bus will depart the Seattle Sheraton on the hour between 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. for the Burke and will depart the Burke Museum on the half hour between 10:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. for return to the Sheraton.

SHA 2015 Seattle: Preliminary Program

The SHA 2015 Seattle preliminary program is available and online registration is now open until December 19, 2014!

Registration

                                  Until 12/1/14    After 12/1/14       
SHA Member:                    $180               $205
Non-Member:                     $280               $305
SHA Student Member:      $85                 $110
Student Non-Member:       $140               $165
Guest:                                $50                 $75

Online: www.sha.org
Until December 19, 2014: The link to the online registration system for the SHA 2015 Conference is posted the SHA website homepage. Instructions on how to register online are available on the website.

Fax: 866.285.3512
Please submit your completed registration form with your credit card payment information to SHA by December 19, 2014.

Mail
Please submit your completed registration form and payment information (check or credit card) by December 19, 2014 to:

Society for Historical Archaeology
13017 Wisteria Drive #395
Germantown, MD 20874 USA

Conference Facilities and Hotel Accommodations
Sheraton Seattle Hotel
1400 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101

Phone Reservations: 1-800-204-6100

Online Reservations to Receive Conference Hotel Room Rate: https://www.starwoodmeeting.com/StarGroupsWeb/booking/reservation?id=140 8270530&key=12D5B991

A limited number of rooms are available at the conference rate for single and double occupancy are $129 plus tax (15.6%) and a $2 per night tax assessment fee. Hotel amenities include an indoor pool and fitness center, bar and restaurants in the hotel, valet parking, and in-room hair dryer, safe, coffeemaker, and iron/ironing board. Note: the hotel has free wireless Internet in the hotel lobby or in-room Internet for a fee.

The “cutoff date” for reserving rooms in the SHA Room Block at the negotiated room rate is 5:00 p.m. PST on Thursday, December 4, 2014. Rooms are filling up fast, so if you wish to stay at the conference hotel at the conference rate, reserve your room soon!

Student Volunteer Positions are Available

Are you a student planning to attend the 2015 SHA conference in Seattle?

If so, you can receive free registration if you sign up to be a volunteer! For more information on volunteering and requirements for free registration, please visit the SHA annual meetings page and scroll down to SHA 2015 Volunteer Form.

If you have any questions, please feel free to email the volunteer director at SHA2015Volunteer@gmail.com

The Conference: Workshops and Tours

The 2015 conference will have FOUR preconference workshops. All workshops will be held on Wednesday, January 7, 2015.

W-01: Excavating the Image: The MUA Photoshop Workshop
Host: T. Kurt Knoerl (The Museum of Underwater Archaeology)
This Photoshop workshop covers basic photo-processing techniques useful to historians and archaeologists. We will cover correcting basic problems in photos taken underwater and on land, restoring detail to historic images, and preparation of images for publications. We will also cover the recovery of data from microfilm images such as handwritten letters. No previous Photoshop experience is needed, but you must bring your own laptop with Photoshop already installed on it (version 7 or newer). While images used for the workshop are provided by me, feel free to bring an image you’re interested in working on. Warning … restoring historic images can be addictive!
Full-day workshop: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 25
Cost: $80 for members, $105 for nonmembers, $50 for student members, and $70 for student nonmembers

W-02: Archaeological Illustration
Host: Jack Scott
Want your pen-and-ink drawings to look like the good ones? Pen and ink is all basically a matter of skill and technique which can be easily taught, and the results can be done faster and cheaper, and are considerably more attractive, than the black-and-white illustrations done on computer. Workshop participants will learn about materials and techniques, page design and layout, maps, lettering, scientific illustration conventions, problems posed by different kinds of artifacts, working size, reproduction concerns, ethics, and dealing with authors and publishers. A reading list and pen and paper (tracing vellum) will be provided, but feel free to bring your own pens, tools, books, and, of course, questions. Be ready to work!
Full-day workshop: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 30
Cost: $85 for members, $110 for nonmembers, $50 for student members, and $70 for student nonmembers

W-03: Underwater Cultural Heritage Resources Awareness Workshop
Host(s): The Advisory Council for Underwater Archaeology
Cultural resource managers, land managers, and archaeologists are often tasked with managing, interpreting, and reviewing archaeological assessments for submerged cultural resources. This workshop is designed to introduce nonspecialists to issues specific to underwater archaeology. Participants will learn about different types of underwater cultural heritage (UCH) sites, and the techniques used in Phase I and II equivalent surveys. This workshop is not intended to teach participants how to do underwater archaeology, but will introduce different investigative techniques, international best practices, and existing legislation. The purpose of this workshop is to assist nonspecialists in recognizing the potential for UCH resources in their areas of impact, budgeting for UCH resource investigations, reviewing UCH resource assessments, developing interpretive strategies, and providing sufficient background information to assist in making informed decisions regarding UCH resources.
Full-day workshop: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 25
Cost: $80 for members, $105 for nonmembers, $50 for student members, and $70 for student nonmembers

W-4: GMAC Anti-Racism Workshop
Hosts: Flordeliz T. Bugarin (Howard University), Michael S. Nassaney (Western Michigan University), and Dr. Emily Drew (Crossroads)
The Gender and Minority Affairs Committee, with the support of the SHA Board, has worked to identify racism in our organization and profession, develop strategies to transform our society, and strive towards a more diverse archaeological community. We recognize that a lack of diversity within our organization has negative outcomes on every member, and as such should be a central concern for all of us. In this effort and in collaboration with Crossroads, we have organized this workshop to show SHA members how to develop a systemic analysis of racism. The goal will be to assist us (both as individuals and as a society) in beginning and strengthening our institutional interventions against racism. During this workshop, trainers from Crossroads will expose SHA members to a common language and mode of analysis, which will in turn assist us in forming a transformation team to develop effective long- term strategies. Participants will learn how to develop and use a common language about racism, as well as a shared definition. We will discuss how to understand racism as a systemic issue in the United States and by extension throughout the world-and not only as an issue of individual attitudes and actions. We will also discuss the racialization of our discipline, both historically and in our contemporary practices of pedagogy and scholarship. A major goal of this workshop is to understand how racism and other policies act as barriers specifically to an all-inclusive SHA. This workshop will in turn explore approaches to dismantling racism that can provide the foundation for institutional interventions against systemic racism. Registration is free of charge, but space is limited, so please register in advance using the option provided on the conference registration form.
Afternoon Workshop: 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Maximum enrollment: 40
Cost: Free of charge

Tours

This year’s Conference offers FIVE exciting tours. All tours will be held on Wednesday, January 7, 2015.

(T-1) Behind the Scenes Tour at the Burke Museum
Join the museum’s curators and explore the Burke Museum Archaeology Collections, which include more than one million objects from around the world and focus on cultural materials from the Pacific Rim. The Burke is best known for its collections of artifacts from the Lower Columbia River and the Puget Sound region of Washington State.

Three groups of 10 people each will receive a personal tour as follows:
• Group 1: Leave the Sheraton at 9:30 a.m., tour: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon; return to Sheraton at 12:30 p.m.
• Group 2: Leave the Sheraton at 10:30 a.m.; tour: 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.; return to Sheraton at 1:30 p.m.
• Group 3: Leave the Sheraton at 11:30 a.m.; tour 12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m.; return to Sheraton at 2:30 p.m.
Cost: $30 per person (includes transportation and admission to the Burke)

(T-2) Washington State Wine and Beer Tour
Tour Washington State’s Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery and enjoy a sample of its award-winning wines. Then you’ll travel a short distance to the Redhook Brewery for a walk-through of the state-of-the-art brewery, information about Redhook history, an overview of the brewing process, a tasting of some of Redhook’s beers, and a souvenir glass! There will also be time for lunch at your own expense at the Brewery’s Forecaster Pub.

Tour start time: 10:00 a.m. The bus will depart from the Sheraton and will return at 4:00 p.m. In the event of extremely inclement weather, the tour will be canceled and your fee refunded. Dress appropriately!

Maximum number of participants: 50

Cost: $50 per person (includes transportation and tour/ tasting fees at Chateau Ste. Michelle and the Redhook Brewery)

(T-3) Seattle Underground
Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour is a leisurely, guided, 75-minute, walking tour beneath Seattle’s sidewalks and streets. As you roam the subterranean passages that once were the main roadways and first-floor storefronts of old downtown Seattle, your guides will regale you with the stories our pioneers didn’t want you to hear. It’s history with a twist! The tour begins inside Doc Maynard’s Public House, a restored 1890s saloon. Following a short intro, you’ll walk through historic Pioneer Square to three different sections of Underground-about three blocks in all.

Tour start time: 2:00 p.m. The entrance to the Underground Tour is at 608 First Avenue in Seattle’s Pioneer Square, between Cherry Street and Yesler Way and approximately 1 mile (12 blocks) from the Sheraton Seattle. Transportation will NOT be provided with this tour.

Cost: $14 for adults (18-59 years old), $12 for students (with valid ID), $12 for seniors (60+). (These are discounted prices for the SHA tour.)

(T-4) Whidbey Island Tour
Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve is an historic rural landscape that includes stunning panoramas, historical communities, Fort Casey and Fort Ebey State Parks, and lands farmed by the descendants of families who filed Donation Claims in the 1850s. The reserve is located north of Seattle on Whidbey Island in Puget Sound and is unique within the National Park Service because most of the land is privately owned. A partnership of the landowners-federal, state, town, and county-provide support to the current community in the preservation of their cultural and natural legacy. This historic rural landscape preserves direct connections to many layers of Pacific Northwest history-Coast Salish peoples, English explorers and traders, American farmers and sea captains, and Chinese farmers. Whidbey Island is the largest jewel in the Puget Sound’s island crown. You’ll travel to Whidbey via bus and ferry. Lunch will be on your own at one of the restaurants on the island.

Tour start time: 9 a.m. The tour bus will depart from the Sheraton and will return by 5:00 p.m. In the event of extremely inclement weather, the tour will be canceled and your fee refunded. Dress appropriately!

Maximum number of participants: 50

Cost: $50 per person

(T-5) Beaux Arts and Art Deco Seattle Walking Tour

During the first quarter of the 20th century, Seattle, “Gateway to the Orient,” could boast of international trade, up-to-date skyscrapers, a thriving entertainment district, and a planned commercial center that would be the envy of other cities. This tour shows off brick- and terra-cotta- clad skyscrapers, private clubs, financial and banking headquarters, and commercial buildings, which expressed the confidence and sophistication of Seattle’s builders. The tour will be led by Larry Kreisman, Honorary AIA Seattle, architectural historian, author, preservation consultant, and since 1997, Program Director for Historic Seattle. He is the author of several books on Seattle’s architecture and history.

Tour start time: 1:00 p.m. This tour will leave from the main entrance of the Sheraton Seattle. Tour will take two to three hours. In the event of extremely inclement weather, the tour will be canceled. Dress appropriately.

Maximum number of participants: 30

Cost: $15 per person