The Week in Historical Archaeology

This week’s photo is of a calligraphy pen excavated from an Aboriginal settlement “at the margin of a Presbyterian Mission site near Weipa” that archaeologist and blogger Mick Morrison (@mickmorrison) has been excavating. Credit for the photo goes to Flinders University graduate student Amy Della-Sale. Mick was gracious enough to write an accompanying blog post about the pen, suggesting that the pen may have been part of a system of donations between the mission and a church goers in Melbourne or Brisbane. Please read more about this fascinating artifact, see additional photos, and give Mick your insight into this fascinating artifact!

SpikeTV and National Geographic Coverage

This week, there were not many news headlines, but the blogs were full information regarding the recent television shows being broadcast by National Geographic and SpikeTV. As you probably know, the SHA has written two blog posts and two letters to Spike TV and National Geographic. You can read the SHA’s official letters here and here.

Two Facebook Groups have also been started in opposition to the SpikeTV and National Geographic Show, and have been cataloguing the various responses from archaeologists and archaeological organizations. They also include a number of discussions between metal detector enthusiasts and archaeologists. This is the best place to get up-to-date information on the topics.

Bloggers have also had some opinions about the importance of context and the dangers of looting:

FPAN’s Shovel Bytes argues that you can’t put a price on context.

Anthroprobably states that “America’s Heritage is Not for Sale”.

John Roby at Digs and Docs also weighs in on the ethics of profiting on heritage.

Elsewhere in the world of historical archaeology:

Believe it or not, other things have been happening in historical archaeology this week:

FPAN’s recent public workshop about archaeological advocacy received some news coverage this week.

The Natural Resources Conservation Service has a useful chart for determining soil texture by feel.

March is Archaeology Month in Arkansas! Here’s a list of the activities. Please, if it’s Archaeology Month in your state, share with us!

Mt. Vernon has a question for the public about their mystery nails: do you know why they’re coated? Help them out at their blog!

The Recent National Preservation Institute is offering a series of seminars in Historic Preservation and Cultural Resource Management (pdf).

 [Photo used with permission from Mick Morrison]

Here’s What’s New in Historical Archaeology This Week

This week’s photo of the week comes from Archaeologist Jamie Brandon (@jcbrandon), who visited Phase II excavations at the Foster Site in Lafayette County, Arkansas. You can see other photos by Jamie on his Flickr Page.

Headlines

Excavations at Monticello are highlighted, particularly their use of maps to help with excavations.

A wooden shipwreck was found in South Africa.

The Virginia Gazette gives a brief history of archaeology in Williamsburg, Virginia.

Call for Papers

The Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology (CNEHA) has their website up for their upcoming 2012 conference in Newfoundland, Canada. It will be held from October 4-7th.

The University of Puget Sound is hosting the Redford Conference in Archaeology, which is accepting abstracts for talks about digital archaeology. The conference will be from October 25-28, 2012.

Resources

Visit the Avondale Burial Place Website to learn about the excavations and history of African American burial grounds in Georgia.

On the Blogs

This Week in Pennsylvania Archaeology highlights the excavations at Old Economy Village, home to the 19th century Christian community group the Harmony Society.

Mick Morrison (@mickmorrison) discusses his survey project in Mareeba, Australia.

Mt. Vernon’s Midden takes us through a three part series on understanding capacity through mugs and cups.

[Photo courtesy of Flickr User Farther Along under Creative Commons License]

Friday Links: This week in Historical Archaeology

This week’s featured photo is from Tiffany Brunson, an anthropology graduate student at the University of Idaho. The photo is of a series of lead disks that she posted on the HistArch list serve last week, which were found at Fort Spokane : other archaeologists have suggested that they may be flattened bullets either waiting to be recast or, the most popular response, is that they are flattened bullets being used as gaming tokens. If you have any ideas, let us know in the comments!

Headlines

A century old plantation and a possible African American cemetery are on land recently purchased in Danville, Virginia.

The Virginia Historical Society is featured on CNN for their recently launched database of enslaved Africans in historical records.

Archaeologists in York are developing an exhibit about their project on homelessness.

The Florida Public Archaeology Network has been working with communities to restore cemeteries.

Manuscript Calls

The African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter is looking for submissions for its next release.

Conferences

Winterthur Ceramics Conference is being held from April 26-27th.

The Visiting Scholar Conference is being held at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, with this year’s topic on: The Archaeology of Slavery: Toward a Comparative Global Framework. It is being held from March 30-31st.

To the Blogs!

Mount Vernon has a nice piece about the wine bottle glass assemblage discovered in their midden.

John R. Roby (@JohnRRoby) has launched a new historical archaeology blog called “Digs and Docs”. Add him to your RSS Feed!

Mick Morrison (@MickMorrison) returns from a blogging hiatus with a description of a 20th century site Presbyterian Mission Site in Weipa, Australia.

There are a couple sitings of papers being presented at this year’s SHA conference in Baltimore on various social media:

Mandy Raslow (@MrshlltwnMauler) and Heather Cowen Cruz have their paper “Excavating with Kids at the Farwell House, Storrs, CT” available on academia.edu, and Terry P. Brock (@brockter…also author of this post) has made his presentation “Place, Space, and the Process of Emancipation” available on his blog.

Have you put your presentation up on the web? Please let us know, we’d love to share it!

Photo: Copyright All rights reserved by Tiffany.Brunson Used with permission from photographer.