New Historical Archaeology Issue: Current Research in South America

The current issue of Historical Archaeology presents the results of broad-ranging archaeological research from Central and South America.  From Spanish cities sacked by pirates, to English ceramics in Venezuelan households, to African scarification and pottery manufacture and marking, to plantation settlements and indigenous populations, to mining landscapes and beyond, this volume provides a fascinating look at a diverse archaeological landscape.  Juan Martin, Alasdair Brooks, and Tania Andrade Lima’s Introduction provides a taste of the delicious stew that is the archaeology of Central and South America.  Buen apetito.

Download the Introduction for free here.

View and download all back issues prior to 2006 here in our Publications Explorer!

The SHA Journal Historical Archaeology is published quarterly, and delivered to SHA Members. Not a member? Follow this link to join!

Historical Archaeology 46(1): New Journal and New Design!

The new issue of Historical Archaeology, the Society for Historical Archaeology’s academic journal, 46(1) is hitting your desks and is certain to catch your attention.  This is the first in a new generation of the journal that features a glossy color cover with the contents listed on the back for easy reference.  But it deserves your attention for more than that. This thematic issue compiled by Uzi Baram and Dan Hughes looks at ethnogensis and other topics through the lens of the many cultures of Florida, and explores the ways in which archaeological and historical research can reveal the way the multiple cultural identities of Florida were created, negotiated, and reformed.  Baram and Hughes’ Introduction, attached, gives you a sense of the historical archaeology of Florida and the contents of this issue, which is one you won’t want to miss.

Download Baram and Hughes’ introduction to Historical Archaeology 46(1), Florida and its Historical Archaeology, for free here.

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