Friday Links: What’s New in Historical Archaeology

This week’s photo of the week was taken at Shadwell, the original home of Peter and Jane Jefferson and the birthplace of Thomas Jefferson. The excavators are Devin Floyd and Michell Sivilich, and they are excavating as part of the Monticello Plantation Archaeological Survey. The survey began in 1997, and includes over 20,000 shovel tests, identifying over 40 archaeological sites. To learn more, you can visit the Monticello Archaeology department, both on the web and on Facebook. Thanks to Sara Bon-Harper, the photographer, for sending us the photo.

Also, we are now featuring our Photos of the Week on our Facebook Page as the banner image, and they will also be included in a Photos of the Week Photo Album. Please visit and “like” the photos you like the best!

Headlines

Excavations are being conducted in Manhattan to mitigate a utility project.

Call for Papers

The inaugural Southeastern Conference on Historic Sites Archaeology has a call for papers, due June 29th. The Conference itself is from August 24 and 25, 2012 in Charleston, South Carolina.

Registration is open for the Underground Railroad Conference, being held in St. Augustine, Florida from June 20-24.

Resources

Book: The Oxford Handbook of Public Archaeology, edited by Robin Skeates, Carol McDavid, and John Carman, is now available.

Journal: The Journal of Field Archaeology is Maney Publishing’s Journal of the Month, providing the past three years of journals for free download.

Blogs

A poster from Fort St. Joseph discussing the production of lead shot.

I talk about the applications of PInterest for digital cultural heritage at my blog, Dirt.

Matt Reeves, who wrote about his metal detecting workshop for us last week, also discusses their finds at the Montpelier blog.

Mount Vernon’s Mystery Midden has some wonderful photographs of the zooarchaeological material, and discusses the importance of the assemblage.

The folks at FPAN’s The Dirt on Public Archaeology highlighted a number of archaeological sites for Florida Archaeology Month.

John Roby discusses the recent letting go of SpikeTV’s American Digger host Ric Savage from his column in American Digger Magazine.

The Week in Historical Archaeology

This week’s photo is of a calligraphy pen excavated from an Aboriginal settlement “at the margin of a Presbyterian Mission site near Weipa” that archaeologist and blogger Mick Morrison (@mickmorrison) has been excavating. Credit for the photo goes to Flinders University graduate student Amy Della-Sale. Mick was gracious enough to write an accompanying blog post about the pen, suggesting that the pen may have been part of a system of donations between the mission and a church goers in Melbourne or Brisbane. Please read more about this fascinating artifact, see additional photos, and give Mick your insight into this fascinating artifact!

SpikeTV and National Geographic Coverage

This week, there were not many news headlines, but the blogs were full information regarding the recent television shows being broadcast by National Geographic and SpikeTV. As you probably know, the SHA has written two blog posts and two letters to Spike TV and National Geographic. You can read the SHA’s official letters here and here.

Two Facebook Groups have also been started in opposition to the SpikeTV and National Geographic Show, and have been cataloguing the various responses from archaeologists and archaeological organizations. They also include a number of discussions between metal detector enthusiasts and archaeologists. This is the best place to get up-to-date information on the topics.

Bloggers have also had some opinions about the importance of context and the dangers of looting:

FPAN’s Shovel Bytes argues that you can’t put a price on context.

Anthroprobably states that “America’s Heritage is Not for Sale”.

John Roby at Digs and Docs also weighs in on the ethics of profiting on heritage.

Elsewhere in the world of historical archaeology:

Believe it or not, other things have been happening in historical archaeology this week:

FPAN’s recent public workshop about archaeological advocacy received some news coverage this week.

The Natural Resources Conservation Service has a useful chart for determining soil texture by feel.

March is Archaeology Month in Arkansas! Here’s a list of the activities. Please, if it’s Archaeology Month in your state, share with us!

Mt. Vernon has a question for the public about their mystery nails: do you know why they’re coated? Help them out at their blog!

The Recent National Preservation Institute is offering a series of seminars in Historic Preservation and Cultural Resource Management (pdf).

 [Photo used with permission from Mick Morrison]

Friday Links: What’s New in Historical Archaeology

Here’s what you may have missed last week in the world of Historical Archaeology online. This week’s photo was snagged from my own flickr account, of a map of an early 19th century site in Virginia taken this summer. Can you spot the four post holes?

We would love to feature more photos, but need photos to feature! If you have a Flickr photo account, and tag photos with a Creative Commons license, please put a link in the comment section below so we can use them in our Friday Links!

Headlines

Hobart archaeologists have discovered a 19th century gallows.

One of the world’s busiest slave ports, the Valongo Wharf, was uncovered in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Archaeologists in South Carolina have discovered a buried chicken at a late 19th century home of a freed slave.

The Archaeological Institute of America has a contest for Online Excavation Outreach, featuring a number of historical archaeology excavations and programs! Give them your votes!

Publications

Anthropologies February issue examines Anthropology and Development.

On the Blogs

Chris Cartellone takes you through the conservation process for Project Solebay, an underwater excavation.

The Florida Public Archaeology Network chronicled a day excavating with high school students, including some good finds!

Edward Gonzalez-Tennant discusses a pre-research trip to Eleuthera, Bahamas, and examines some potential plantation sites on the island (and takes some wonderful photos).

[Image by Flickr User TerryBrock used under Creative Commons license]