At a Glance: Student-focused Activities at the SHA 2014 Conference

SHA student members will participate actively in this year’s annual conference. In addition to the familiar, the APTC Student Subcommittee (SSC) is hosting new events. Students in Quebec City will find focused events occurring every day of the conference. Here is a brief guide and links for more details.

A SHA tradition, the Past Presidents’ Student Reception will be held this year on January 9th starting at 4:30. The SHA likes to support its students and this is how the past presidents’ show it. Senior members of the organization, including SHA past and current Presidents, join in the mix. This mixer is an opportunity to chat with them as well as to meet other students.

Earlier on January 9th the SSC will host, in collaboration with the SHA’s Ethics Committee, its first ever Ethics Bowl. Come support competing teams engaged in ethical debates of import to all practicing archaeologists. If you missed out on this year’s competition don’t worry the SSC will be signing up teams for next year.

Don’t know what a Pecha Kucha is? Join us on Friday for this fast paced fun new session format. Suggested by our new friends from University of Laval, each presentation will show twenty slides for twenty seconds and be followed by a brief discussion.

Next up is the SSC RAP Session. This informal session encourages dialogue directed by students. Panelists join students in small groups or talk one-on-one about career goals, research issues or simply negotiating coarse work. Pop in and meet some SHA members who have made themselves available directly to students for this unique session.

The Conference Committee has been incredibly generous to the SSC this year. Most committee meetings take place very, very, very, early in the morning. This year, however, the SSC meeting has the most favorable slot- lunchtime on January 11th. So grab a sandwich and come join the Student Subcommittee. It is the best way to make new connections, participate in the SHA and gain leadership experience.

Traditionally the SSC and ACUA co-sponsor a special forum for students. This year’s topic, “Reaching Out: Public Archaeology for Students and New Graduates,” will address issues ranging from the practical to the ethical. This dynamic group of panelists should not be missed.

If you’re in the bookroom, stop by and say hello! SSC members will periodically be available at the SHA table. If we’re not there, please snag a flyer, which includes information about how you can participate in the SHA’s only student-run committee.

Finally, if you want to contribute to discussion or follow student-related goings on at SHA, you can search and follow social media tagged with #SHA2014, #SSC, and/or #students.

Here is a quick summary of sessions. Double check event rooms as they may change.

Schedule at a glance:

Jan 9
PAN3-8 Ethics Bowl 301B 1:30-3

Jan 10
PAN-92 Powered by Pecha Kucha Session 207 1:30-3
PAN-106 RAP session 207 3:30-5
Student Awards 200C 5-6

Jan 11
MTG-24 Student Subcommittee Meeting See Prog. 12-1:30 ALL WELCOME
PAN-149 Forum 207 1:30-5

Panel Session Topic: “Training Historical Archaeologists in the 21st Century: Does Theory Matter Anymore?”

Terry Majewski and I are facilitating what will undoubtedly be a thought-provoking, highly interactive, and potentially controversial panel discussion on the training of historical archaeologists. The session, entitled “Training Historical Archaeologists in the 21st Century: Does Theory Matter Anymore?” will be held on Thursday, January 9, from 1:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. (Room 301A).  Panel members will include Mary Beaudry, Lu Ann De Cunzo, John Doershuk, Adrian Praetzellis, Timothy Scarlett, Teresa Singleton, and Mark Warner.  This session will include lots of time for questions and discussions among the panel members and session audience, so we hope many of you will be able to attend the session.

The panel discussion begins with the premise that historical archaeology still falls within two overarching theoretical camps:  (1) postmodern/post-processual archaeology and (2) processual archaeology. The former includes multiple approaches such as critical theory, Marxist theory, feminist or gendered archaeology, post-colonial archaeology, practice theory, etc. Processual archaeology is a continuation of the New Archaeology of the 1970s, which applies scientific methods to archaeological research.  Our panel of prominent historical archaeologists will evaluate the role and impact of these differing theoretical orientations in preparing students for careers in both academia and the world of cultural resource management (CRM)/heritage management. Our panel members, representing both academia and applied archaeology, including CRM, will be asked to consider whether or not these two differing theoretical orientations have equal applicability toward advancing a student’s career in academia vs. a career in CRM; and toward contributing to the questions that count in historical archaeology.

The panel will be asked to address the following questions:

Question 1: The majority of historical archaeology in the United States and Canada is conducted to fulfill the requirements of environmental and historic preservation laws. How can training in a postmodern approach to historical archaeology benefit a student seeking a career in CRM, when the work they will be doing:

  • will be conducted in a business or government agency context,
  • will involve the production of technical reports to be reviewed by government agencies,
  • will be used to demonstrate legal compliance with historic preservation and environmental laws, and
  • might also involve the implementation of public outreach and engagement programs, and consultation with descendent communities and other public stakeholders in the archaeological effort?

Question 2: The articles published in Historical Archaeology and recent volumes on the discipline of historical archaeology seem to suggest that postmodernism is the predominant theoretical orientation for historical archaeological endeavors in academic settings. This also seems to be the case in terms of the sessions and papers presented at SHA’s annual meetings over the last several years.  Do you believe that this is the case, and if so, what role, if any, does a processual approach to historical archaeology have in the training of university students for a career in academia?

Question 3: Do we have an ethical obligation to objectively present the realities of the job market to students pursuing a career in historical archaeology?  If we do, what are the most effective methods and approaches to present these realities to students?

Question 4: How can we ensure as a discipline that practitioners in all career tracks have the opportunity, grounding, and commitment to make a difference and contribute to answering the questions that count in historical archaeology?

Hope to see you at the session and we look forward to some lively discussions!

GMAC Diversity Field School Competition

This year the Gender and Minority Affairs Committee (GMAC) is hosting its first annual Diversity Field School Competition. In an effort to continue making the field of historical archaeology more inclusive of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, abilities, and socio-economic background, the competition will recognize those who have shown a commitment to increasing diversity in the field and encourage further discussion of the topic. Applicants are required to submit a short essay on diversity, a summary of their field school, and some form of multimedia (photo, pamphlet, video clip, etc.) that highlights diversity in their field school. All awardees will be acknowledged at the 47th Conference on Historical and Underwater Archaeology and recognized on the SHA website, while the first place winner will receive special commendation. GMAC encourages submissions from all SHA members and conference attendees. The Application Form is available online and completed applications—as well as additional questions—may be directed to GMACdiversityfieldschool@gmail.com. For more information, please refer to the Submission guidelines.

Toward A More Diverse SHA

The idea for the Diversity Field School Competition developed out of a series of larger discussions within the SHA about viable ways to increase diversity within the organization. At the 2011 SHA conference, GMAC members determined that increasing diversity was an important step toward social justice and helping the SHA reflect the diverse communities historical archaeologists serve. These calls for greater diversity were reinforced by subsequent GMAC panels and initiatives such as the GMAC Student Travel Award and diversity training for SHA board members. Earlier this year current SHA president, Paul Mullins, announced his commitment to “make diversity an increasingly articulate part of the SHA mission and our collective scholarly practice.” Additionally archaeologists abroad are discussing the issue of diversity, particularly after the recent release of the Archaeology Labour Market Intelligence: Profiling the Profession 2012-2013 report which identified 99% of archaeologists working in the UK as white. As a result we hope this competition helps to not only recognize those who have shown a commitment to diversity, but also open dialogue about ways to increase the presence of archaeologists from the many underrepresented groups.

We encourage you to also visit the SHA Events website for more information about other SHA competitions, events, and workshops. Hope to see you all in Quebec!

Interested in becoming a part of the conversation? Let us know how archaeologists can work together to increase diversity in the field, and please consider joining or volunteering for the GMAC.