Glassmaking & Glassmakers

Makers mark on a late 19th century beer bottle; click to enlarge.

Bottle & Glass Makers Markings
HOME: Glassmaking & Glassmakers: Bottle & Glass Makers Markings

(Click HERE to jump down this page to the listing of linked Makers Marking articles.)

The subject of bottle makers marks is a complex one - as is virtually everything to do with bottle dating and identification.  However, the subject is important to refining the estimated date range for the manufacture of a bottle, how the bottle was made to some extent, and for the determination of origin (website "goals" #1, #3, and #4 noted on the Homepage). 

Some glass containers make quite obvious which glass company made the item.  For example, the quart canning jar pictured to the right is boldly embossed on one side with PACIFIC / SAN FRANCISCO / GLASS WORK (sic) making it easily clear that the jar was manufactured by the Pacific Glass Works of San Francisco, CA. - the first successful glass company west of the Rockies - which operated under that name from 1862 to 1876 (Toulouse 1971).

Other makers marks are not as obvious as this jar.  The image at the top of this page is of the base of a Wisconsin made beer bottle embossed with C. C. G. C. / No 1. on the base; it is also embossed E. L. HUSTING / MILWAUKEE/ WIS. in a circular body plate (the reverse side is also embossed THIS BOTTLE / NOT TO / BE SOLD).  This bottle was certainly made by the Cream City Glass Company (Milwaukee, WI.) which operated from 1888 to 1894 (Toulouse 1971; Lockhart pers. comm. 2007).  Eugene L. Husting was in business under his name from 1877 to 1900 (Van Wieren 1995) which more than spans the time that Cream City Glass was in business, producing a certain (as certain as the historical record is accurate) date range for the production of this bottle to between 1888 and 1894.  This is typical of the type of makers marks found on the bases of mouth-blown beer bottles produced from the 1870s through the 1910s until National Prohibition and is an example of how useful makers marks can be for the accurate dating of historic bottles.  (Photo courtesy of Bill Lockhart.)

The following is quoted from the introduction to the book Bottle Makers and Their Marks by Dr. Julian Toulouse and is one of the better quick summaries on the subject of maker's marks pertinent to the goals of this website. (Note: Dr. Toulouse wrote his book from the perspective of assisting collector's as well as archaeologist's as implied in the following quote.):

Trademarks, whether registered or not, brand names, and other marks and symbols of identification found on bottles are datum points in determining the history and ages of the collectors' bottles.  When the owner of the mark is known, and when more exact dates can be assigned to its use, the mark becomes a means of dating the piece upon which is appears.  If the mark was used for many years, we may have to rely on other considerations in order to date the piece within the mark's span of years. (Website author's note: "considerations" would include manufacturing based diagnostic features - a primary goal of this website - and/or local research in to the user of the bottle, if that fact is known via embossing or labeling.)  If the period of use of the mark was short, the age of the bottle may be pinpointed to a short period of time.  In some instances, lucky for the collector but unlucky for the user of the mark, the period may be reduced to one or two years.  One factory making beer bottles in the 1880s, whose ownership, name, and mark changed five times in eleven years, has helped historical archaeologists date a number of sites in the western United States. (Toulouse 1971)

Export style "pint beer from 1941; click to enlarge.Base of an Owens-Illinois Glass Co. produced bottle dated 1941.The pictures to the left show the base of an 11 oz. beer bottle (and the entire bottle) which shows the some of the distinctive marks that the Owens-Illinois Glass Company - which had many plants around the country - used beginning in 1929 or 1930 to at least the mid-1950s.  More specifically, the marks on this particular bottle indicate it was made in 1941 ("1" to the right of the diamond O-I mark) at the Oakland, CA. plant ("20" to the left of the makers mark).  Why not 1931 or 1951?  See the machine-made bottle dating page Question #11 for more information on this bottle.  Also consult the article by Bill Lockhart - located at the following link - for more information on the marks of the Owens-Illinois Glass Company, whose marks are probably the most commonly encountered U. S. makers marks of the 20th and early 21st centuries (Lockhart 2004d).

The information below directs a user towards some of these sources of information or provides links to other works that will assist in the interpretation of most known makers marks.  Some marks - like the Owens-Illinois Glass Company mark shown above - have a lot of good information available to allow for definitive interpretation; a link to an excellent article on the subject is found below.  Other suspected maker's marks have not even been accurately assigned to a particular glassmaker and even if the maker is known, much company specific research has yet to be done.  In short, though a lot of information is available there is still a lot yet unknown; the author of this website is a member of a group that is currently pursuing that task...more on that below...



Specific Bottle Maker Articles


Salem Glass Works company store "script"; click to enlarge.This important website section is devoted largely to the published articles of the Bottle Research Group (BRG) members - past, present...and future (more below) - on most major bottle producers in the U. S. and a few Canadian, Mexican and English manufacturers...all free of charge!

In order to make full use of this comprehensive information, however, one has to know what mark or marks were used by what glass or bottle manufacturing company.  If not known and the marking is either a clearly identifiable alphabetical letter or letters (like A. B. Co. for the American Bottle Company) or a distinct logo or symbol, a user must first determine the origin of that makers marking.  This can be done by using the appropriate "Makers Markings Logo Table" to ascertain which mark/marks were used by what company.  This alphabetical grouping of individual tables is located further down this page below the following box or by clicking on the following link to "jump" to that section: 

Makers Markings Logo Tables Chart

(As an alternative,  consult the Glass Factory Marks on Bottles website.  The following link will take one to David Whitten's exceptional webpages that cover most known American glass makers marks assigning specific markings to the known (or strongly suspected) user of the marking - Glass Factory Marks on Bottles Website  David Whitten is a serious avocational student of bottle and insulator makers marks and his pages are a wealth of information on the subject.  His webpage is also a great resource for those wishing to figure out what an observed makers mark stands for on a bottle they may have and an approximate date range.  Whitten's site typically also includes some brief history behind the companies.  Also see his main webpage - "Glass Bottle Marks - Collecting History of the Glass Manufacturing Industry" - at the following link:  http://www.glassbottlemarks.com)

Important Notice to Users!

Currently, and ongoing for many years to come, the Bottle Research Group is using this Historic Bottle Website to exclusively publish new makers markings articles as well as revisions of previously published ones.  This is all directed towards the eventual completion of...

"ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MANUFACTURERS
MARKS ON GLASS CONTAINERS
"

This work will be a massive treatise on American glass container manufacturers from the late 18th century to the present day.  These new/revised articles are noted below in green font followed by the publishing date.  Supplementary files to complete each alphabetical section (e.g., "Preface/Introduction & Table of Contents" and the pertinent "List of Factories" and "Logo Table" of actual bottle markings) will also be listed in blue font in the appropriate alphabetical section. 

Currently (January 2014) the "A" and "B" Makers Markings sections are totally complete.  Take a look at these sections below which if printed out (over 1000 pages total) in their entirety comprise the first two volumes of the "Encyclopedia of Manufacturers Marks on Glass Containers."  This is the pattern to be followed for subsequent volumes.

In the shorter term, preliminary PDF copies of all the alphabetical "Logo Tables" - tables of the actual markings, the associated glass makers that used them and and dates of use - have been posted in their entirety here with the actual manufacturers articles to be added later as part of the multi-year project to complete the "Encyclopedia."  These "Logo Tables" are all being listed along with a short "Introduction" in the box immediately below this section and above the "Encyclopedia" boxes. 

All of the logo tables have been loaded below including two versions (larger and smaller file sizes) which includes ALL of these tables combined into one downloadable file! 
These tables
in total comprise a quick reference guide for the identification & dating of makers markings found on historic bottles!

The articles listed in blue font further down the page (below the "Encyclopedia" alphabetical boxes) are those published via other venues - primarily in "Bottles and Extras" which is the official publication of the The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors (FOHBC). Although virtually all of these older articles are or will be superseded by updated web published articles, they will continue to be listed and available here as published articles of use as references.

All articles - previously published or new here - are also all found in the "Periodical & Journal Articles" section of the Reference Sources/Bibliography page.
 

 

Makers Markings Logo Tables (most preliminary drafts)

*Final tables although any or all could be updated in the future as needed.

 

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MANUFACTURERS
MARKS ON GLASS CONTAINERS

 

"A" Makers Markings

Preface/Introduction & Volume "A" Table of Contents

"A" Factory List
"A" Logo Table

 

 

"B" Makers Markings

Preface/Introduction & Volume "B" Table of Contents

"B" Factory List
"B" Logo Table

 

 

"C" Makers Markings

Preface/Introduction & Volume "C" Table of Contents

"C" Factory List
"C" Logo Table (preliminary draft)

 

"D" Makers Markings

Preface/Introduction & Volume "D" Table of Contents

 

"D" Factory List
"D" Logo Table (preliminary draft)

..."E" and the rest of the alphabet in the years to come!


Previously Published Makers Markings Articles
(Virtually all of these articles have been or will be replaced in the years to come by the Encyclopedia of Manufacturers Marks on Glass  Containers articles listed and linked in the boxes above.  They will, however, continue to be listed and available here as published articles of use as references.)


Additional articles of interest

The Milk Route articles

The Milk Route is the official publication of the The National Association of Milk Bottle Collectors  and another venue for articles published by BRG members which may be of interest to site users.  To quote from their website:  The National Association of Milk Bottle Collectors (NAMBC) provides research, educational opportunities and information about milk bottles, milk bottle collecting and dairy memorabilia to its members, museums and the general public... The NAMBC is often called "The Milk Route", which was an early name for the organization, and is currently the name of the NAMBC's monthly newsletter.  The following are articles from that publication compliments of the NAMBC:

    Liberty Glass, Lamb Glass, and updates - Bill Lockhart (Issue #287:1-3; September 2004)
    The L. G. CO. Mark (Again) - Bill Lockhart (Issue #290:2; December 2004)
    Milk Bottle Production at the Knox Glass Bottle Co. - Bill Lockhart, Pete Schulz, Carol Serr and Bill Lindsey (Issue #335:1-4; September 2008)
    The DuBois Glass Co. - Bill Lockhart, Pete Schulz, Carol Serr and Bill Lindsey (Issue #352:1-2; February 2010)
    The IPG Mark - Not Quite - Bill Lockhart (Issue #356:3; June 2010)

    The Mysterious Number System - Bill Lockhart, Pete Schulz, Al Morin and others  (Issue #359:1-4; September 2010)

    Blake-Hart: The Square Milk Bottle -
Bill Lockhart, Pete Schulz, Carol Serr, Beau Schriever, and Bill Lindsey (Part 1 [Issue #369:1-3; July 2011] and Part 2 [Issue #370:1-3; August 2011])
  

    ...more to be added in the future...


Miscellaneous articles

The following are some additional articles not specifically related to makers markings or are from other publications, i.e., not Bottles and Extras or The Milk Route (see References page for the source):

    A New Twist for Uncapping Old Information about Glass Artifacts    Bill Lockhart (webpage [2001d])
    The Other Side of the Story: A Look at the Back of 7-Up Bottles   Bill Lockhart (The Soda Fizz - Jan/Feb 2005)
   
A Tale of Two Machines and A Revolution in Soft Drink Bottling - Bill Lockhart (Bottles & Extras, Spring 2006)
    The Origins and Life of the Export Beer Bottle - Bill Lockhart (Bottles & Extras, May/June 2007)
 
  Rabbit Trails: The Twisted Path to Bottle Identification - Bill Lindsey (Bottles & Extras, May/June 2009)
   
The Finishing Touch: A Primer on Mouth-blown Bottle Finishing Methods - Bill Lindsey (web published on this website 2010)   
 


Bottle Makers and Their Marks
by Dr. Julian Toulouse

Image of Toulouse's Bottle Makers and Their Marks book; click to enlarge.The classic published reference on the subject of maker's markings, as noted above, is the aptly named Bottle Makers and Their Marks by Dr. Julian Toulouse.  Published in 1971, this book is a good source of information on bottle makers marks and the history of the companies that produced them.  To quote from David Whitten's website - "(Toulouse's)...book is the best reference work ever published on glass manufacturers' marks on bottles, but it does contain many errors which have been discovered...since it was first published."

A plethora of new information has been uncovered and older inaccurate information refined since the publishing of the book, much of which is now or soon to be available on this website as noted above.  Regardless of that, Dr. Toulouse's book may still be a useful "quick" reference source for maker's mark information.  When used in hand with the information provided on this page a bottle information seeker has powerful tools in their quest to find bottle dating "truth."  This book is currently being reprinted by Blackburn Press; check the Historic Bottle Related Links page under Toulouse (1971) for a link to this website and the reprint.  It is not cheap but may be worth it.
 


Glass/Bottle Makers catalogs

And finally, one of the more useful tools for determining what a particular bottle shape or type was likely used for are period bottle/glass makers illustrated catalogs.  This website provides complete scanned copies (jpegs) of several never before re-printed bottle makers catalogs covering a wide array of bottle types.  Click on the following links to access these catalogs:

1906 Illinois Glass Co. bottle catalog
1916-1917 Kearns-Gorsuch Bottle Co. catalog
1920 Illinois Glass Co. bottle catalog
1926 Illinois Glass Co. bottle catalog


1869 Whitney Glass Works token; click to enlarge.

Return to the top of this page.
Return to the Glassmaking & Glassmakers page.

3/22/2014


This website created and managed by:
Bill Lindsey
Bureau of Land Management (retired) -
Klamath Falls, Oregon
Questions?  See FAQ #21.

Copyright 2014 Bill Lindsey.  All rights reserved. Viewers are encouraged, for personal or classroom use, to download limited copies of posted material.  No material may be copied for commercial purposes. Author reserves the right to update this information as appropriate.